Careers360 Logo
BDS Admission Without NEET - Eligibility, Fees, Colleges & Admission Process

VSEPR Theory - Practice Questions & MCQ

Edited By admin | Updated on Sep 25, 2023 25:23 PM | #NEET

Quick Facts

  • VSPER (Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion) Theory is considered one of the most asked concept.

  • 55 Questions around this concept.

Solve by difficulty

The correct order of bond angles (smallest first ) in H_{2}S,NH_{3},BF_{3},and \: SiH_{4} is

Consider the molecules CH4, NH3 and H2O. Which of the given statements is false?

The hybridizations of atomic orbitals of nitrogen in \text{NO}_2^ + ,\text{NO}_3^ - and \text{NH}_4^ + respectively are

In which of the following pair both the species have sp^{3} hybridization?

In which of the following molecules the central atom does not have sp^{3} hybridization?

In which of the following species the central atom has the type of hybridization which is not the same as that present in the other three?

In which of the following pairs of molecules/ ions BF_{3}NO^{-}_{2} , NH^{-}_{2} and H_{2}O , the central atom is sp^{2}  hybridized?

Health & Allied Sciences Expo

25+ Institutes | 65+ Programs | Cashback on application fees | 10+ Scholarships | On-Spot admission offer

India's Biggest Health and Allied Sciences Expo

Discover your best fit from 25+ Institutes offering 65+ top-notch Health and Allied Sciences Undergraduate programs.

In which of the following pairs of molecules/ ions, the central atoms have sp^{2} hybridization?

According to the VSEPR theory, repulsions between electron pairs in filled shells are:

NEET 2024 College Predictor
Know your admission chances in Medical, Dental & AYUSH colleges with NEET score/rank.
Try Now

In water \mathrm{(H_{2}O)}, the central atom oxygen (O) forms ________ hybrid orbitals, which overlap with two 1s orbitals of hydrogen atoms to form O-H bonds.

Concepts Covered - 1

VSPER (Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion) Theory

VSEPR Theory

Valence shell electron-pair repulsion theory (VSEPR theory) enables us to predict the molecular structure, including approximate bond angles around a central atom of a molecule from the estimation of the number of bonds and lone pairs of electrons in its Lewis structure. 

The main postulates of VSEPR theory are:

  • The actual shape of molecule depends upon the number of electron pairs (bonder or non–bonded) around the central atom.

  • The electron pairs tend to repel each other due to their negative charge.

  • Electron pairs arrange themselves in such a way that there exists a minimum repulsion between them.

  • The valence shell is considered as a sphere with the electron pairs placed at distance.

  • A multiple bond is treated as if it is a single electron pair & the electron pairs which constitute the bond as a single pair.

  • The repulsive interaction of electron pairs decreases in the order as mentioned below:

Lone pair (lp) – Lone pair (lp) > Lone pair (lp) – Bond pair (bp) > Bond pair (bp) – Bond pair (bp).

  • Double bonds cause more repulsion than single bonds, and triple bonds cause more repulsion than a double bond. This repulsion decreases sharply with increasing bond angle between the electron pairs.

Let us understand VSEPR theory using a gaseous BeF2 molecule. The Lewis structure of BeF2 as shown in the figure, there are only two electron pairs around the central beryllium atom. With two bonds and no lone pairs of electrons on the central atom, the bonds are as far apart as possible, and the electrostatic repulsion between these regions of high electron density is reduced to a minimum when they are on opposite sides of the central atom, thus the bond angle is 180°.

A Lewis structure is shown. A fluorine atom with three lone pairs of electrons is single bonded to a beryllium atom which is single bonded to a fluorine atom with three lone pairs of electrons. The angle of the bonds between the two fluorine atoms and the beryllium atom is labeled, “180 degrees.”

The BeF2 molecule adopts a linear structure in which the two bonds are at maximum distance from each other and maintain an angle of 180°.

 

As given in the table below, two regions of electron density around a central atom in a molecule form a linear geometry, three regions form a trigonal planar geometry, four regions form a tetrahedral geometry, five regions form a trigonal bipyramidal geometry, and six regions form an octahedral geometry.

A table with four rows and six columns is shown. The header column contains the phrases, “Number of regions,” “Spatial arrangement,” “Wedge/dash Notation,” and “Electron pair Geometry.” The first row reads: “Two regions of high electron density ( bonds and/or unshared pairs )”, “Three regions of high electron density ( bonds and/or unshared pairs ),” “Four regions of high electron density ( bonds and/or unshared pairs ),” “Five regions of high electron density ( bonds and/or unshared pairs ),” and “Six regions of high electron density ( bonds and/or unshared pairs ).” The second row shows diagrams of orbitals. The first image shows two oval-shaped orbs with an arrow indicating an angle of 180 degrees. The second image shows three oval-shaped orbs with an arrow indicating an angle of 120 degrees. The third image shows four oval-shaped orbs with an arrow indicating an angle of 109.5 degrees. The fourth image shows five oval-shaped orbs with an arrow indicating an angle of 90 and 120 degrees. The fifth image shows six oval-shaped orbs with an arrow indicating an angle of 90 degrees. The third row contains Lewis structures. The first structure shows a beryllium atom single bonded to two hydrogen atoms. The second structure shows a boron atom single bonded to three hydrogen atoms. The third structure shows a carbon atom single bonded to four hydrogen atoms. The fourth structure shows a phosphorus atom single bonded to five fluorine atoms. The fifth structure shows a sulfur atom single bonded to six fluorine atoms. The fourth row contains the phrases “Linear; 180 degree angle,” Trigonal Planar; all angles 120 degrees,” “Tetrahedral; all angles 109.5 degrees,” “Trigonal bipyramidal; angles of 90 degrees and 120 degrees. An attached atom may be equatorial, ( in the plane of the triangle ), or axial, ( above the plane of the triangle ),” and “Octahedral; 90 degrees or 180 degrees.”

Study it with Videos

VSPER (Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion) Theory

"Stay in the loop. Receive exam news, study resources, and expert advice!"

Books

Reference Books

VSPER (Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion) Theory

Chemistry Part I Textbook for Class XI

Page No. : 112

Line : 35

E-books & Sample Papers

Get Answer to all your questions

Back to top